Dr. Tomic-Canic, who has conducted ground-breaking translational research on the molecular nature of diabetic foot ulcers and wound healing in general, is an integral part of our clinical diabetic research program’s monthly lecture series. Topics she will be exploring with our mentees include the importance of patient consent, the preparation of tissue specimens, and the translation of scientific discoveries in molecular markers into new clinical protocols. Dr. Tomic-Canic, during her monthly visits at Winthrop-University Hospital, will also be working with our mentees on individual research projects, and helping them develop clinical assays that correlate to clinical outcomes.

Dr. Tomic-Canic has had an ongoing long-term relationship with the NIH, including current NIH grant funding. Her research focuses on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of skin tissue repair and regeneration and its pathogenesis, by integrating basic science discoveries with clinical outcomes. This includes identifying which molecular and cellular mechanisms are utilized during normal wound healing, identifying what molecular events lead to wound healing impairment in chronic (non-healing) wounds, and developing local sustained gene-delivery mechanisms for treating such wounds. Among other accomplishments, Dr. Tomic-Canic’s lab was responsible for identifying c-myc, the first gene known to impair healing in chronic wounds in patients, as well as the recent discovery that aberrantly expressed microRNAs inhibit the healing of chronic venous ulcers (click here to view the actual publication). She has been a co-principal investigator with Dr. Brem on numerous studies of molecular markers of healing, and has published 23 papers with Dr. Brem related to how various characteristics of patient tissue specimens—including their genetic makeup and other molecular factors—correlate to clinical outcomes.

Click here to view Dr. Tomic-Canic's 2012 presentation at the NIH's prestigious Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series. In her talk, titled, “Wizardry of Tissue Repair and Regeneration: A Tale of Skin Cells When Their Magic is Gone,” she discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of wound healing and its progenitors.

Marjana Tomic-Canic, PhD

Professor of Dermatology, U. of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine

Director, Wound Healing and Regenerative Medicine Research, U. of Miami

Adjunct Associate Scientist, Hospital for Special Surgery

Adjunct Associate Professor of Dermatology, NYU School of Medicine

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